Category Archives: Worship

Click here to view worship announcements

FAMILY ACTIVITY FOR LENT: MAKING PRETZELS

pretzel

Pretzels have an important meaning during Lent. Pretzels were made in the fifth century as a Lenten food in Austria, Germany, and Poland. People began to make them on Ash Wednesday, the very first day of Lent. The word “pretzel” is a German word meaning “little arms.” The dough was shaped in such a way to look like two arms crossed in prayer.

Pretzels were made to take the place of bread, since milk, eggs, and fats were not used during Lent. On certain days during Lent it was the custom to give pretzels to the townspeople who were poor.

As a family, make some pretzels. Two variations for making pretzels are included at the bottom of this sheet. Enjoy the pretzels and let them remind you that Lent is a time of prayer. Before you eat the pretzels, say a prayer together:

Dear God, we ask you to bless these pretzels which we are about to eat. Each time we eat them may we be reminded that this is the season of Lent, a time of prayer. Help us to remember to pray for those who need our prayers each day. Keep your loving arms around us, O God, to protect us. In Jesus’ name, Amen.

Adapted from “Pretzel Prayer,” A Time of Hope: Family Celebrations and Activities for Lent and Easter,Morehouse-Barlow Co., Inc., 1979 (out of print).

BREAD PRETZELS

1 1/4 cups water (85°)
1 tablespoon dry yeast
1/2 teaspoon sugar
4 1/2cups flour
1 egg yolk
1 to 2 teaspoons water or milk
Coarse salt

Let yeast and sugar dissolve in water for one hour. Add flour to yeast mixture and beat until smooth. Knead mixture for seven to eight minutes. Place in a greased, covered bowl and let the dough rise until double in size. Divide the dough in half; then divide each half into smaller pieces of equal size. Roll each piece in your hands to make pencil shapes twelve (12) to fifteen (15) inches long. Shape each length of dough into pretzels (see the diagram). Place on a greased baking sheet. Brush with egg yolk and water or milk mixture. Sprinkle with coarse salt. Bake at 325 degrees until lightly browned on top.

Lent Devotions

March 6, 2019
By Leigh Boelkins Van Kempen

Psalm 6:
O Lord, do not rebuke me in your anger,
or discipline me in your wrath.
Be gracious to me, O Lord, for I am languishing;
O Lord, heal me, for my bones are shaking with terror.
My soul also is struck with terror,
while you, O Lord—how long?

4 Turn, O Lord, save my life;
deliver me for the sake of your steadfast love.

Read the full psalm.
I have a confession to make: I have a hard time saying, “I’m sorry.” Or, perhaps, more accurately, I say, “I’m sorry, but … ” My acknowledgement of how I have hurt someone or disappointed someone is often followed by my excuse for why it happened. However, I don’t think I’m unique in this. Perhaps you, too, have a hard time saying, “I’m sorry.”

Psalm 6 is the first of seven penitential psalms (6, 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, 143) frequently used as part of the Christian church’s Lenten observance, starting with Ash Wednesday. The theme of these seven psalms is consistent: the psalmist expresses deep sorrow for his sin, asking God for help and forgiveness. In today’s psalm, David itemizes his distress. Both his body and his soul feel overwhelmed with terror. David realizes he is experiencing the consequence of his own sin. He cries out in physical and spiritual pain, knowing that God’s discipline is justified for the ways he has disobeyed God.

David’s confession before God is anchored in his confidence that God will forgive. He calls out for God’s deliverance, convinced that God will hear and answer because of God’s steadfast love. In spite of the situation in which David finds himself, he knows that he will not permanently abide in terror and distress because of God’s unfailing love. “Depart from me, all you workers of evil, for the Lord has heard the sound of my weeping. The Lord has heard my supplication; the Lord accepts my prayer” (vv. 8-9).

As we enter this Lenten season, we can say, “I’m sorry” before God. When we confess before our merciful Lord, we are assured of God’s forgiveness. Instead of saying, “I’m sorry, but,” we can say, “I’m sorry because of your steadfast love and forgiveness!” What a wonderful God we serve!

Prayer: Holy One, we confess before you our sinfulness, our brokenness, and our need to experience your abundant mercy. Help us, each day, to come before you and say, “I’m sorry.” In Jesus’s name we pray. Amen.
Leigh Boelkins Van Kempen is a chaplain at Resthaven Care Community in Holland, Michigan. She and her husband, Case, also an RCA minister, have three adult, married children and four (and a half!) beloved grandchildren.

Join us for Jazz Vespers with Jazz Central Sunday, March 3rd at 5:30 pm

The group styles itself “Jazz Central”. It includes seniors Giovani Barnes, Shane Laurent, Malachi and Malik Maillard, and Central High alumni/UVI student George Maillard. Started by Mario Thomas at Woodson Jr. High, continuing their studies with Stan Joines at Central, these musicians are also currently playing all over the island with YGT, Adjoa, Marsven David, Elvis Pedro, and more.

The director of Jazz Central, S J  has been teaching band at Central High School since 1991 and is well known in the community. He has carried Central students to competitions in Orlando twice, Atlanta twice, the D.C. area twice, Michigan, and Puerto Rico several times. Alumni can be found performing all over the world, and of course in most all of our local bands.

 

 

Weekly Calendar

Wednesday

       3:00 pm – Contemplative Circles

       6:15 pm – Yoga for the People

Friday

       9:00 am – Yoga for the People

       10:15 am – Contemplative Circles

Sunday

        8:30 am – Choir Practice

        9:30 am – Worship

        5:30 pm – Jazz Vespers

Yoga

Yoga for the People

If you’re looking for new ways to pray, clear your mind, and heal your body, then don’t forget that SCRC hosts yoga twice a week. You can join other members of the community and congregation on Wednesday evenings at 6:15 pm and Friday mornings at 9:00 am. The practice is led by Claudia Collins and is free for everyone (but we are taking donations).

Contemplative Circles: Wednesdays at 3:00 pm or Fridays at 10:15 am

Basil Pennington wrote, “Life is rich, very rich, with communication.  Let us listen together. Let us share what we hear.  Let us walk together in the way, more sure for our being together and hearing together.”  That’s what Contemplative Circles are about.  Listening for God as we listen to one another.  We’ll use writing, silence, and conversation to dig deeper into a selected Scripture from the previous Sunday.  You can join the circle on Wednesdays at 3:00 pm or Fridays at 10:15 am.

Sacred Breath

Spirit. Wind. Breath. Both biblical languages use a single word for these three invisible movements.  The Holy Spirit is like a wind from God that breathes new life into our bodies. Focusing on our breathing, learning how to breathe deeply, can restore our bodies and souls.  Ray Bratcher will be leading Sacred Breath classes at SCRC on Saturday afternoons from 4-5:30 pm on March 2nd, 16th, and 30th.

Weekly Calendar

Monday

        5:00 pm – Consistory Meeting

Wednesday

       12:00 pm – Contemplative Circles

       6:15 pm – Yoga for the People

Friday

       9:00 am – Yoga for the People

       10:15 am – Contemplative Circles

Sunday

        8:30 am – Choir Practice

        9:30 am – Worship

Contemplative Circles: Wednesdays at 12:00 pm or Fridays at 10:15 am

Basil Pennington wrote, “Life is rich, very rich, with communication.  Let us listen together. Let us share what we hear.  Let us walk together in the way, more sure for our being together and hearing together.”  That’s what Contemplative Circles are about.  Listening for God as we listen to one another.  We’ll use writing, silence, and conversation to dig deeper into a selected Scripture from the previous Sunday.  You can join the circle on Wednesdays at 12:00 pm or Fridays at 10:15 am.

Thank you to everyone for an awesome Spaghetti Dinner and Auction